Good Hope norovirus outbreak update

Published/updated: 25/03/11 13:47

Please note: this information has been updated as of 5/3/2010.  For the latest information, clickhere.

The number of wards closed to new admissions at Good Hope has risen to five today. There are currently many cases of norovirus within the community, so as a precautionary measure to protect patients, Good Hope is closing all wards except for the children’s and maternity wards to visitors for the next 48 hours. The situation will be reviewed after this time.

Paediatrics and maternity visiting has restricted visiting in place of one visitor per patient per day. Visitors are asked to speak to their relatives and friends by calling the Hospital switchboard on 0121 424 2000 and requesting to be put through to the ward manager. There are phones available at each bedside and there is a facility on the television to receive and send emails. Anyone proposing to visit someone in hospital is asked to check the Hospital’s website www.heartofengland.nhs.uk for any further visiting updates.

Good Hope norovirus update

Published/updated: 25/03/11 13:41

Following on from the recent major outbreak of norovirus at Good Hope, the situation has now improved with only two wards still affected and remaining closed.  Visiting restrictions of one visitor, per patient, per day are still in place for all unaffected wards. Elective and day case surgery is back to normal.

Norovirus is still circulating in the community and precautions are still in place for any patients being admitted with symptoms. Visitors are asked to remain vigilant in washing their hands before entering and leaving ward areas and not to visit if they, or a family member of close contact, is or has, suffered from norovirus and still has symptoms. Please remember to wait 48 hours from the symptoms disappearing before entering the Hospital.

Please note there are currently no visiting restrictions in place at Heartlands and Solihull Hospitals.

For further information and any further visiting updates, please refer to the Hospital’s websitewww.heartofengland.nhs.uk.

Good Hope norovirus update

Published/updated: 25/03/11 13:37

Following on from the recent major outbreak of norovirus at Good Hope, the situation has now improved and visiting restrictions have been lifted.

Norovirus is still circulating in the community and precautions are still in place for any patients being admitted with symptoms. These should be admitted into side rooms. Strict infection control precautions, hand hygiene and bare below the elbow should be observed to prevent any potential spread.

Please note, Heartlands and Solihull currently have no visiting restrictions in place. Any changes to visiting will be circulated to staff through the communications email.

Good Hope norovirus outbreak – ward closure update

Published/updated: 25/03/11 10:20

There are currently four wards closed to new admissions at Good Hope due to norovirus. These are wards 7, 10, 17 and 24.

Visiting restrictions

Over the weekend period, no visiting will be allowed on ward 7, but wards 10, 17 and 24 are allowing restricted visiting of one visitor, per day per patient between the hours of 1pm and 2pm and 6pm and 7pm. These restrictions will be reviewed on Monday.

Anyone planning to visit a friend or relative in Hospital, is advised to phone ahead for any updates as the situation may change. The switchboard can be contacted on 0121 424 2000, you can then ask to be put through to the ward you wish to enquire about.

Alternatively, you can check the Hospital’s website www.heartofengland.nhs.uk The situation is being closely monitored and strict infection control precautions, hand hygiene and bare below the elbow are in place in all our Hospitals.

Statement: Good Hope Hospital Norovirus Update

Published/updated: 21/03/11 10:22

Lisa Dunn, hospital director, said: “The number of wards closed to new admissions at Good Hope has risen to three today. There are currently many cases of norovirus within the community, so as a precautionary measure to protect patients, the Hospital is closing all wards except for the childrens, maternity and intensive care wards to visitors for the next 48 hours. The situation be reviewed after this time.

Please note Paediatrics and Maternity visiting is not effected. Patients are asked to speak to their relatives and friends by calling the Hospital switchboard on 0121 4242000  and requesting to be put through to the ward manager. There are phones available at each bedside and there is a facility on the television to receive and send emails.  Anyone proposing to visit someone in hospital is  asked to check the Hospital’s website www.heartofengland.nhs.uk for any further visiting updates.

Elderly care team receive excellent care award

Published/updated: 17/03/11 10:23

The Good Hope short stay elderly care team celebrate their award. ( L-R) Back row: Jonathon Vaughan, operations manager for elderly care, Andy Laverick, Good Hope executive lead, Dr Asif Muhammad, specialist registrar, Dr Avion Bamodu, consultant elderly medicine, Adrian Stokes, finance director, Emma Talla, general manager for elderly, Lyndsey Wills, sister, Jessica Gill, Mrs Robinson’s granddaughter, Dr Peter Wallis, clinical director for elderly, Gail Allport, senior sister, Dr Shah Vaquas, consultant elderly, Donna Woodings, matron, Lisa Goodwin, sister for elderly, Maria Merrett, healthcare assistant, Graham Langford, staff nurse, Haleigh Starkey, health care assistant, Laura Poyner, staff nurse. Front row: Mrs Robinson’s daughters Paula Robinson and Jan Gill, head nurse, Andrea Field, Good Hope patients Ethel Cox, Dorothey Worley,  Elizabeth Perlic and Eva Grice, healthcare assistant, Julie Pallett, and Di Collins, daughter of Mrs Robinson.An elderly care team at Good Hope Hospital has been recognised for its efforts in improving patient care.

The ‘excellent care award’ was given to the short stay elderly care team, who not only demonstrated having gone the extra mile to benefit their patients, but also their patients’ families and carers as well.

The award was judged by looking at the team’s performance, with particular focus on patient experience and the quality of nursing care given. Innovation in the way the team worked together was also an important factor and how this resulted in more positive feedback and reduced staff sickness levels. The family of Jean Robinson, a Good Hope patient who sadly passed away in 2009, were involved in choosing which team should be awarded. The family has worked closely with matron, Donna Woodings, and the elderly care team in recent months to help find new ways of working with patients and their families.

Di Collins, the daughter of Jean Robinson, presented the award to senior sister for short stay elderly care, Gail Allport.  Di said: “I chose this team to receive the prize money and award because when I visited the ward, I was so impressed to see such a personalised and friendly service for the patients. All the nursing staff, patients and families were on first name terms and this means a lot to relatives who want to feel fully involved in what is happening with their loved one.”

Dr Peter Wallis, clinical director for elderly medicine, said: “Care of the frail, older patient is a complex and specialist area of medicine, so team spirit is extremely important. This team has demonstrated they have this, they can be innovative and have worked together to find the best ways to deliver good care. Elderly care should feel very positive about the future and I would like to thank Di Collins and other members of the Robinson family for attending the presentation today.”

Gail Allport, senior sister, said: “This award means so much to my team and I, especially as this has come at such an exciting time for elderly care. Not only are we being recognised for all the positive changes we have made for our patients, our team has now got a new and state-of-the-art environment. We have very recently moved into our new ward within the new ward block building here at Good Hope and it feels wonderful to be able to care for our patients in first class surroundings.”

Lights Camera Action!!

Published/updated: 16/03/11 10:28

Film crews and hospitals don’t often appear in the same sentence as many of us think of Hollywood blockbusters or soaps on TV.

In recent years issues around health have been a major focus in the media and there have been a series of documentaries showcasing things from people’s embarrassing illnesses to women giving birth.

Heartlands Hospital is the biggest of the three the Trust manages and we have many areas of specialty which have attracted many filming requests.

One particular area that has been inundated is our obesity centre which is one of the largest in the country. We see a variety of obesity patients many of whom have other underlying illnesses such as diabetes and others who have reached dangerous levels of obesity.

One of the first programmes to be made at Heartlands obesity centre was a programme called ‘The Hospital’ which followed the journey of a couple of the patients and the service offered by Heartlands. The show was a huge hit and one of the case studies became a mini celebrity in her area.

Many would ask how do we fit filming into a busy hospital environment and why would we want to be involved. Well our communications department manage all filming requests and work with our wards and departments to ensure any filming doesn’t interrupt the day to day work of our medical staff. It has to be said we do not except all requests that come our way and we make very careful selections of the projects we do get involved in.

We feel that certain filming projects are a great way to not only showcase some of the great work that goes on in our hospital but it is also a good way to raise awareness of some the major health issues we see every day.

So next time you see a health documentary on TV just remember these are real people with real health issues and the medical teams are working hard to ensure these people live healthier lives.

Nicole Taylor

Heartlands Hospital communications lead

Local medic makes marathon memorable

Published/updated: 16/03/11 10:27

Tom JohnsonA medic from Heartlands Hospital is set to take on the London Marathon in memory of a colleague who sadly lost his battle with a rare form of cancer.

Tom Johnson, a senior radiographer at the Hospital, will be taking on the 26 mile run next month in memory of Simon Parker and has pledged to raise more than £5,000 through sponsors.

Rebecca Parker, Simon’s wife, said: “Simon was diagnosed with Lymphoma in September 2009 and since then it has been a rollercoaster journey. From chemotherapy to transplants Simon had been through a lot and at one point we thought we may get through it when we were given the all clear. However it wasn’t long before the Lymphoma returned and our worlds were turned upside down again. The second time round really hit us hard and we made the very difficult and harrowing decision to withdraw from all medical treatment and Simon spent the rest of his days at home with the people he loved.”

“I am touched that Tom has chosen to run the marathon in Simon’s honour and I’m happy that the proceeds will be going towards such a good cause.”

Tom, said Simon will be sorely missed by everyone that knew him. I had been thinking of how I could do something in his honour and knowing Simon it had to be sports related. When I heard about the opportunity to run the Marathon in his memory I had to go for it. I spoke to his wife and asked if she minded and she was pleased that I would have the chance to run. I must confess it has always been a dream to run the London Marathon and to combine a sporting achievement with such a personal tribute to a great man is a truly wonderful thing to do.”

Simon Parker was diagnosed with a form of cancer known as Lymphoma and sadly passed away in November 2010.

All donations raised by Tom will go towards the cardiology department at Heartlands Hospital, where a variety of cancer patients are treated. If you would like to sponsor Tom, please visit www.justgiving.com/Tom-Johnson1.

Patients give local hospital the thumbs up in national win

Published/updated: 16/03/11 10:26

Patient experience awardThe Heart of England Trust received national recognition this week, for its work on improving patient experience.

The Trust’s ‘back to the floor’ programme fought off tough competition from organisations in both the public and private sectors to win the award for ‘access to information’.

Simon Jarvis, head of patient engagement, said: “The back to the floor programme evaluates our patient’s experiences through one to one surveys where patients are asked about their experience whilst in hospital. The results are then used to address any areas of concern, helping us to improve the overall experience of all our patients.”

“This is a fantastic award which reflects the hard work and support, both clinical and non clinical teams have put into developing a real-time measure of patient satisfaction. We’re now surveying 100% of inpatient wards each month across all three hospital sites and the results are really helping teams monitor and improve the services they offer based on this important customer feedback.”

The team were awarded by The Patient Experience Network in a national awards ceremony aimed at recognising, celebrating and sharing examples of great initiatives in patient experience.

Lights Camera Action!!

Published/updated: 16/03/11 09:39

Film crews and hospitals don’t often appear in the same sentence as many of us think of Hollywood blockbusters or soaps on TV.

In recent years issues around health have been a major focus in the media and there have been a series of documentaries showcasing things from people’s embarrassing illnesses to women giving birth.

Heartlands Hospital is the biggest of the three the Trust manages and we have many areas of specialty which have attracted many filming requests.

One particular area that has been inundated is our obesity centre which is one of the largest in the country. We see a variety of obesity patients many of whom have other underlying illnesses such as diabetes and others who have reached dangerous levels of obesity.

One of the first programmes to be made at Heartlands obesity centre was a programme called ‘The Hospital’ which followed the journey of a couple of the patients and the service offered by Heartlands. The show was a huge hit and one of the case studies became a mini celebrity in her area.

Many would ask how do we fit filming into a busy hospital environment and why would we want to be involved. Well our communications department manage all filming requests and work with our wards and departments to ensure any filming doesn’t interrupt the day to day work of our medical staff. It has to be said we do not except all requests that come our way and we make very careful selections of the projects we do get involved in.

We feel that certain filming projects are a great way to not only showcase some of the great work that goes on in our hospital but it is also a good way to raise awareness of some the major health issues we see every day.

So next time you see a health documentary on TV just remember these are real people with real health issues and the medical teams are working hard to ensure these people live healthier lives.

Nicole Taylor

Heartlands Hospital communications lead

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