Free events for locals to mark World AIDs Day

Published/updated: 28/11/11 14:27

Locals are invited to enjoy a series of music, dance, poetry and fashion events taking place across the city to mark this year’s World AIDs Day.

With more than 400 new cases diagnosed in the West Midlands in the last year; the free events will highlight the importance of HIV testing in a positive way.

To interview Dr Taylor, HIV specialist at Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, about the World AIDs Day events and how HIV is affecting the region, contact Nikki Boileau in communications on (0121) 424 1668.

The World AIDs Day events at Cannon Hill Park and the Midlands Art Centre (MAC) will incorporate three themes – reflection, education and celebration. There will be a lantern parade on the lake and a procession in the Park, as well as a musical and fashion extravaganza at the MAC. A tribute to Dame Elizabeth Taylor, the event features gowns designed by South Birmingham College and music by Bournville Musical Theatre Company and Birmingham Midlands Operatic Society.

Come along and help mark World AIDs Day on 1 December in the city.  The lantern procession event starts at the MAC at 7pm, and will proceed to the band stand in Cannon Hill Park, and the fashion show and tribute event at the MAC starts at 8.45pm.

For further information about the World AIDs Day 2011 events, log on to www.worldaidsdaybirmingham.org.uk

Joint effort sees Solihull Hospital patients going back to school

Published/updated: 22/11/11 14:32

A new joint school at Solihull Hospital is preparing knee and hip replacement patients for quicker recovery.

The patients and the person they have chosen to be their ‘coach’ attend a weekly session where they are taught exercises and how best to fit the stockings they need to wear after their operations.

Three enhanced recovery practitioners have been appointed to run the sessions and are also on hand to support patients before, during and after their treatment.

Debbie Ferriday, one of the practitioners, said: “The sessions have already been a great success. Patients are making a quicker recovery and appreciate having us on hand to encourage them and answer their questions. The joint school helps us with our aim of patients being ready to go home within four days of their operation. During the sessions patients are encouraged to ensure they are in the best possible health before surgery and are given elbow crutches to practice with at home. Physiotherapists and occupational therapists show the patients how to walk with crutches and how to do exercises to aid recovery and anaesthetists are on hand to talk through any concerns they may have about anaesthetic.”

Clive Simmonds, a recent graduate of the programme, explains: “It was my first hospital experience since I was 10 and I couldn’t believe how good it was. Everybody could not do enough in passing on skill and kindness and addressing our concerns. The joint school prepared me well for the operation and having to walk on crutches afterwards. I can now get back to enjoying retirement again.”

The sessions were introduced at Solihull following the success of a joint school at Good Hope Hospital, which is also part of Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust.

‘Thank you’ gift helps Hospital radiology department

Published/updated: 22/11/11 14:31

Solihull Hospital’s radiology department has received a generous donation from the family of a former patient to say a big ‘thank-you’ for the care he received.

Walter Deakin (Wally), from Knowle, died aged 80 in January 2010 after a long battle with chronic lymphatic leukaemia. Instead of flowers and in memory of his time spent at the Hospital, his wife Audrey asked for donations. Along with her daughter Sandy Marshall, an administrator in the Hospital’s acute medical unit who previously worked as a radiology assistant, she raised over £1,000 for the radiology department.

Superintendent radiographer Gill Tomlinson said: “We wanted to improve the experience of patients coming to the department and purchased a range of equipment including a drugs cabinet for the acute medical unit and a heat sensitive panel for children to play with while they are in the waiting area.”

Audrey Deakin said: “I just wanted to purchase some equipment for them as a thank you. Everyone has been absolutely brilliant.”

Help your local Hospital in its quality quest

Published/updated: 22/11/11 14:30

Local residents have the chance to say what Solihull Hospital and Community Services should have as top quality goals for the next year.

There is an open invitation to a Quality Account Workshop with the opportunity to find out what improvements have already been made and suggest what should be measured in 2011/12.

Last year a target was set to assess 90 per cent of patients for venous thromboembolism (blood clots forming in a vein and travelling around the body) when they are admitted to hospital. By December 2010 more than 95 per cent of patients were being assessed on admission following measures such as electronic prompting and further training for staff. The Hospital is committed to further improvement and this is the second year the Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust has held these workshops.

One of the priorities set for community services this year was to develop more methods of reviewing the impact and benefits care has for patients.  These are now being tried out with some services and feedback will be reviewed towards the end of year.

Managing director Claire Molloy said: “We want the people who use our services to tell us how they would like us to improve them. The feedback we received from over 100 people who attended last year’s workshops was extremely useful. The Quality Account helps us improve the quality of all services based on what the people who use them tell us is important to them. It is our commitment to local people and will be publically available.”

A half-day workshop with lunch will be held at Solihull Renewal Centre, Lode Lane, Solihull, B91 2JR on Monday 28 November starting at 9.45am. Anyone wanting to attend one of the sessions can contact Catherine Williams on 0121 424 3328 or email catherine.williams@heartofengland.nhs.uk

Joint effort sees Solihull Hospital patients going back to school

Published/updated: 22/11/11 08:50

A new joint school at Solihull Hospital is preparing knee and hip replacement patients for quicker recovery.

The patients and the person they have chosen to be their ‘coach’ attend a weekly session where they are taught exercises and how best to fit the stockings they need to wear after their operations.

Three enhanced recovery practitioners have been appointed to run the sessions and are also on hand to support patients before, during and after their treatment.

Debbie Ferriday, one of the practitioners, said: “The sessions have already been a great success. Patients are making a quicker recovery and appreciate having us on hand to encourage them and answer their questions. The joint school helps us with our aim of patients being ready to go home within four days of their operation. During the sessions patients are encouraged to ensure they are in the best possible health before surgery and are given elbow crutches to practice with at home. Physiotherapists and occupational therapists show the patients how to walk with crutches and how to do exercises to aid recovery and anaesthetists are on hand to talk through any concerns they may have about anaesthetic.”

Clive Simmonds, a recent graduate of the programme, explains: “It was my first hospital experience since I was 10 and I couldn’t believe how good it was. Everybody could not do enough in passing on skill and kindness and addressing our concerns. The joint school prepared me well for the operation and having to walk on crutches afterwards. I can now get back to enjoying retirement again.”

The sessions were introduced at Solihull following the success of a joint school at Good Hope Hospital, which is also part of Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust.

Community family fun day in aid of getting locals fitter

Published/updated: 14/11/11 14:33

A free family fun day hosted by Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust will be held at Millennium Point in Birmingham later this month in aid of making the region healthier.

Medics from the Trust will be on hand to give free health checks and offer important advice on topics ranging from diabetes to heart and kidney disease. A wide range of fun filled activities will also be available for all the family, including face painting, juggling workshops, musical entertainment and various interactive health sessions.

Community Health Fair organiser, Sandra White, said: “We want to be able to support our communities in any way we can and that’s why we decided to hold a fun day so that families and locals of all ages have the opportunity to learn more about staying fighting fit and healthy. We do hope people will come along and join in the fun at Millennium Point, it’ll be a great day out.”

The event, held in association with Midlands Co-operative Society is taking place on Saturday 26 November 2011 at Millennium Point from 10am to 4pm. The first 70 people to arrive will be in with a chance to win free tickets to ThinkTank science museum.

For more information call Sandra White on 0121 424 1218 or email sandra.white@heartofengland.nhs.uk

Arm yourself against flu this winter warn Hospital experts

Published/updated: 09/11/11 14:36

Diane Tomlinson, lead infection control and prevention nurseHealth experts at Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust are urging people to get the flu jab this month as the temperatures plummet and the cold spell begins.

Diane Tomlinson, lead infection control and prevention nurse at Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust, explains: “The cold weather becomes a breeding ground for winter vomiting bugs, cold and flu which can often make people, particularly the vulnerable, very sick. Seasonal flu is a highly infectious disease which is caused by a virus which travels easily from person to person as well as in the air.

“That’s why if you are pregnant, aged over 65, suffer from a heart condition, diabetes, liver disease or breathing problems, you are at higher risk of more serious illnesses such as bronchitis and pneumonia. If you fall into any of the categories mentioned, you are eligible to have the flu vaccine free of charge from your GP. Supermarkets and pharmacies also offer these for a small fee, so if you are not entitled to have one for free, you can still go along and have your vaccine.

“To prevent the spread of flu germs, try to use a tissue when you sneeze then put the tissue in the bin and wash your hands. If you or family member has suffered from sickness and/or diarrhoea, you will still be highly contagious for 48 hours after the symptoms disappear. Until this time, contact with others and any Hospital visits should be avoided.”

Remember to choose well this winter before you visit your local emergency department, remember that walk-in centres have a host of GPs and nurses ready and waiting to see you, with less waiting time than your local hospital A&E. You can also make an appointment with your GP or call NHS Direct which is available with advice 24 hours a day on 0845 46 47.

Car fanatics accelerate fundraising for Birmingham’s breastfeeding mums

Published/updated: 02/11/11 08:40

SMALLER PICNew mums at Heartlands Hospital are to benefit from a speedy donation of £1,000 from local car association, West Midlands Impreza’s.

The funds will be put towards the purchase of a much needed breast pump within the maternity department, helping support the youngest patients and their families whilst in hospital.

Mr Keshav, a car fanatic from Stechford, along with his group, West Midlands Impreza’s, made the donation following the birth of his son, Kain, by caesarean section earlier this year.

Mr Keshav, said: “Kain was born seven weeks prematurely and was treated on the neonatal ward after weighing only 4lb 1. Kain struggled with breast feeding and we relied heavily on the support given to us by the specialist nurses. We were amazed by the way staff had treated our son and wanted to find a way to help the unit and say thank you following the experience we had. Instead of a membership fee for our group, we make a donation every time we meet.”

Ali White, infant feeding advisor, said: “Breast milk helps to reduce the risk of infection in sick and premature babies and has a unique role in the development of the immune system, gastric tract and brain development.  The provision of a new breast pump will make it easier for more mothers to pump their milk frequently whilst visiting their babies on the unit.”

Hospital unveils results of national first lung cancer treatment programme

Published/updated: 02/11/11 08:39

Heartlands Hospital lung cancer patient, Neville Howard, with consultant thoracic surgeon, Mr Babu Naidu, at Heartlands Hospital.
Heartlands Hospital lung cancer patient, Neville Howard, with consultant thoracic surgeon, Mr Babu Naidu, at Heartlands Hospital.

Lung cancer patients and their specialists at Heartlands Hospital came together this week to unveil the results of a national first-of-its-kind treatment initiative.

Since the Rehabilitation for Operated lung Cancer (ROC) programme was launched just over 12 months ago, the team has recorded a 30 per cent reduction in cancer surgery-related lung complications and halving of patient re-admissions to hospital after initial discharge. Medics at Heartlands now plan to spread the ROC programme nationally to benefit lung cancer patients across the country.

Neville Howard, 72, a lung cancer patient at Heartlands Hospital, said: “After being diagnosed with lung cancer last year, I was booked in to have my left lung removed and immediately started the ROC programme. It has been invaluable to me throughout the whole process as there was a dedicated team on hand to offer support whenever I needed it. I was only in hospital for three and a half days with my surgery and this is due to the good level of fitness I had gained from undertaking ROC. I wouldn’t be as fit as I am now without the programme and take this opportunity to thank Mr Naidu and the team for all their help and support at such a difficult time.”

Mr Babu Naidu, consultant thoracic surgeon, said: “Overall we have found there are improved global patient outcomes in those completing the programme and reduced complications. As lung cancer is the number one cancer killer in the UK, this is an essential next step for the treatment of lung cancer. Lung cancer tends to present later and patients may also be older and unfit for surgery. Lung cancer surgery is a major hurdle for anyone to overcome, and the ROC programme equips patients with the tools they need to do this.”

The ROC programme is designed with the specific aim of preparing and supporting patients throughout the treatment process – from beginning to end. Through a mix of specialist well-being and exercise classes, physiotherapy, dietary advice and smoking cessation sessions for those who require them, the ROC team ensures patients are in the best of health before and after their surgery.

NHS Hospitals not only from the Midlands area but from London, Liverpool, Hull and Leeds have already decided to adopt the programme.

Hospital first in the Midlands to offer new treatment for high blood pressure

Published/updated: 02/11/11 08:37

RDP_IDA1656_BWPatients with high blood pressure at Good Hope Hospital are the first in the region to benefit from a ground-breaking new treatment.

The procedure, called renal denervation (RDN), is a minimally invasive technique which aims to reduce blood pressure in patients for whom all blood pressure medication has failed. The procedure has been successfully undertaken on the first three patients at the Hospital, with more expected to follow suit.

Paula Field, 40, from Lichfield was the first patient to undergo the renal denervation procedure at Good Hope. She said: “I have suffered high blood pressure and kidney disease for several years following a very difficult pregnancy. I have taken many different types of medication to help bring my blood pressure down and nothing has helped.  I jumped at the chance to have the new procedure and this has brought my blood pressure down to a much safer level.”

Dr Richard Watkin, consultant cardiologist said: “This procedure is a breakthrough and offers new hope for medication tolerant high blood pressure patients. High blood pressure is very common, affecting around 39 per cent of people in the West Midlands. Having high blood pressure puts people at a higher risk of serious conditions such as heart attacks and stokes.”

The procedure is performed under local anaethesia by guiding a device into the arteries of the kidneys using x-ray guidance. Once in place, the device produces high frequency radio waves. This permanently interrupts abnormal nerve signals from the kidney to the heart, brain and blood vessels, responsible for high blood pressure.

To find out more about the renal denervation procedure at Good Hope Hospital, visit http://www.heft-radiology.co.uk/

Accessibility
Close Close