More help for Solihull’s new mums as report confirms breast is best

Published/updated: 29/10/12 11:24

The op

Breastfeeding peer supporters
Breastfeeding peer supporters

ening of a new breastfeeding cafe by Solihull Community Services has coincided with the publication of a new report from children’s charity UNICEF highlighting the benefit of breast milk for babies.

Held at Kingshurst Children’s Centre at Kingshurst Primary School in School Close every Monday from 1 to 2.30pm; it is the sixth cafe to be set up by Solihull Community Services across the borough. New mums and mums-to-be can drop in for help, information and support from each other and from trained breastfeeding peer supporters, who are all mums who have experienced the typical difficulties that can arise.

The UNICEF report, called “Preventing disease, saving resources”, underlines how breastfeeding is the single best step a new mum can take to give her child the ideal start in life. It also says that supporting women to breastfeed will improve the quality of life for women and their children by preventing disease, saving the NHS money in the long term.

Carmen Baskerville, Infant feeding co-ordinator for Solihull Community Services (part of Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust) said: “Breastfeeding gives babies all the nutrients they need and helps protect them from infection and other diseases. For mothers it reduces the risks of some illnesses later in  life such as  breast and ovarian cancer. Breastfeeding also helps mum and baby to get closer physically and emotionally. It uses 500 calories a day and it’s free!”

For more information on breastfeeding (including the other breastfeeding cafes) and services to support mums in Solihull, please visit www.youplusbaby.co.uk, Heart of England Foundation Trust’s website for new parents.

More help for Solihull’s new mums as report confirms breast is best

Published/updated: 29/10/12 11:21

Breastfeeding peer supporters
Breastfeeding peer supporters

The opening of a new breastfeeding cafe by Solihull Community Services has coincided with the publication of a new report from children’s charity UNICEF highlighting the benefit of breast milk for babies.

Held at Kingshurst Children’s Centre at Kingshurst Primary School in School Close every Monday from 1 to 2.30pm; it is the sixth cafe to be set up by Solihull Community Services across the borough. New mums and mums-to-be can drop in for help, information and support from each other and from trained breastfeeding peer supporters, who are all mums who have experienced the typical difficulties that can arise.

The UNICEF report, called “Preventing disease, saving resources”, underlines how breastfeeding is the single best step a new mum can take to give her child the ideal start in life. It also says that supporting women to breastfeed will improve the quality of life for women and their children by preventing disease, saving the NHS money in the long term.

Carmen Baskerville, Infant feeding co-ordinator for Solihull Community Services (part of Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust) said: “Breastfeeding gives babies all the nutrients they need and helps protect them from infection and other diseases. For mothers it reduces the risks of some illnesses later in  life such as  breast and ovarian cancer. Breastfeeding also helps mum and baby to get closer physically and emotionally. It uses 500 calories a day and it’s free!”

For more information on breastfeeding (including the other breastfeeding cafes) and services to support mums in Solihull, please visit www.youplusbaby.co.uk, Heart of England Foundation Trust’s website for new parents.

Talk to us – health chiefs urge patients

Published/updated: 19/10/12 11:29

Patients and carers are being urged to get involved with Solihull Hospital and community services. Solihull Patient and Carer Advisory Group meets at the Hospital one evening every eight weeks and is keen to attract new members.

Jamie Emery, the Hospital’s patient and public involvement manager, said: “The group was formed to allow for an exchange of views between people who use our services and staff regarding existing services and potential developments. This is an ideal way for patients and carers to be involved and we encourage anyone who wishes to make a difference to their local health services to come along and help us improve the services we deliver.”

The next meeting will be on Wednesday 31 October 2012 at 6pm at Solihull Hospital Education Centre. To book or for more information call Catherine Williams on 0121 424 3328.

Group chairman, Kieran Dooley, said: “Since joining the group I have got an understanding of the everyday working of the NHS. At each meeting we have a guest speaker to discuss the responsibilities of their department. As lay people we get to discuss any problems passed on to us from people who have used the services.”

Boost for Good Hope patients with recovery at home service launch

Published/updated: 18/10/12 11:32

Pic 1 Recovery at Home Service launch at Good HopeGood Hope Hospital, in partnership with Healthcare at Home Ltd, is set to launch its first recovery at home (R@H) service this week, enabling some patients to recover in the comfort of their own home rather than in hospital.

The service, available initially for elderly and trauma and orthopaedic (T&O) patients, enables some patients to leave hospital as soon as they are clinically stable to complete the remainder of their hospital care in their home environment. Patients are only eligible for the service if clinicians are confident it is safe and all the necessary support is in place to do so; with experienced healthcare professionals then ensuring patients receive care and rehabilitation tailored to their own needs.

R@H works to complement local health and social care and community providers by working together to support the safe movement of patients out of the acute hospital setting. Additionally, the service reduces the length of the patient’s stay in hospital, relieving the pressure on the wards and freeing up vital ward beds.

In commenting on the initiative, Ruth Poole, Healthcare at Home’s group commercial director, said: “By working with existing community and social care providers, the team will provide a seamless transition for patients from the acute hospital setting back to their place of residence, supported by a 24/7 Care Bureau which offers clinical support for patients, carers and clinicians. We look forward to building a successful partnership with all the staff and patients at Good Hope, as well as the local community teams”.

Sue Moore, managing director of Good Hope said, “Each patient using the R@H service will remain under the care of the hospital consultant whilst using the service. We are pleased to be able to offer this care option to our patients – research to date shows that patients recover better in the comfort of their own home. It also makes it easier for friends and family to visit.

“The resource savings are far outweighed by the potential reduction of risk to patients while in the acute setting. We have not quantified, but expect to see a reduction in falls, infection and medication errors as a result of the service’s introduction. We also foresee that patients may access social care at a later stage as a result of being supported in their own home environment – all in all it’s a win win for patients and the Hospital”.

Chance to learn from Hospital cervical cancer specialist

Published/updated: 18/10/12 11:31

Locals are invited to learn about cervical cancer at a free health talk at Heartlands Hospital next week.

Consultant gynaecologist, Mr Raj Saha will discuss the causes and symptoms of cervical cancer, who is most at risk of developing the disease and how it is treated. With nearly 1,000 women dying of cervical cancer in England each year, it is the second most common cancer in women aged 35 and under.

Mr Saha says: “If diagnosed early, the outlook for those with cervical cancer will usually be very good and a complete cure is often possible.  This is why it is so important for women who are between 25 and 49 years old to attend appointments every three years through the NHS national screening programme.  Anyone who wants to know more about cervical cancer, including what happens during the screening, otherwise known as a smear test and what the test results mean is welcome to come along to the seminar.”

Seminar organiser, membership and community engagement manager, Sandra White, said: “We hope people will come along to the seminar and leave feeling a lot more knowledgeable about cervical cancer and the signs and symptoms to look out for. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask our experts questions and to discuss their own thoughts and experiences of the disease. The Hospital is committed to educating the public about their health.”

The seminar is taking place on Tuesday 23 October at 5pm in the Education Centre at Heartlands Hospital. To book your place or to find out details of the Hospital’s future health seminars, contact Sandra White on 0121 424 1218 or email sandra.white@heartofengland.nhs.uk.

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